Father’s Day

A Happy Father’s Day to all of the good fathers, step fathers, father figures, foster father, mentors and the like who have taken the responsibility to raise, cultivate and educate children so they become well rounded, contributing men and women in life. This is the first Father’s Day post for Smooth Vintage (woohoo) and we decided to not put together a list as to why dads are great, influential and so on. Or even what gifts would be suitable for the type of dad you have. Instead we decided to share, with permission, an inspiring and touching story of one photo. A photo that brought reassurance and closure to somone and really brought home the importance of having a father around:

This is a picture of my father and my grandmother. It was taken in December of 1989.  At the time, he had no idea that he had an eight-year-old son living in North Jersey. He died in 2002, without ever knowing I existed.
I spent my entire childhood wondering things about my father: What does he look like? Is he smart? Is he tall? What does his voice sound like? What if we met? Would he accept his Black son? In 2006, thanks to the Internet and an online genealogy database maintained by the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, I was able to find out some basic information, including that he died a few years earlier. I reached out to his uncle, and a few weeks later his niece contacted me to let me know some information about his health history she thought I should know. She was understandably skeptical, and did not seem like she wanted to take any steps toward building a relationship. I did not expect to hear from any of my father’s family ever again. So I was pleasantly surprised when my father’s aunt sent me a graduation card in 2008, along with this picture. For the first time, I saw what my father looked like. It is one of the greatest gifts I’ve ever received.
This isn’t a sob story. My life is fantastic, and I have been fortunate enough to have some great father figures in my life, liked Donald Dyson. But on this Father’s Day, I just wanted to remind everyone not to take your relationships with your fathers for granted. Because some of us only have a picture.
Photo: This is a picture of my father and my grandmother.  It was taken in December of 1989.  At the time, he had no idea that he had an eight-year-old son living in North Jersey.  He died in 2002, without ever knowing I existed. I spent my entire childhood wondering things about my father:  What does he look like?  Is he smart?  Is he tall?  What does his voice sound like?  What if we met?  Would he accept his Black son?  In 2006, thanks to the Internet and an online genealogy database maintained by the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, I was able to find out some basic information, including that he died a few years earlier.  I reached out to his uncle, and a few weeks later his niece contacted me to let me know some information about his health history she thought I should know.  She was understandably skeptical, and did not seem like she wanted to take any steps toward building a relationship.  I did not expect to hear from any of my father’s family ever again.  So I was pleasantly surprised when my father’s aunt sent me a graduation card in 2008, along with this picture.  For the first time, I saw what my father looked like.  It is one of the greatest gifts I’ve ever received.   This isn’t a sob story.  My life is fantastic, and I have been fortunate enough to have some great father figures in my life, liked Donald Dyson.  But on this Father’s Day, I just wanted to remind everyone not to take your relationships with your fathers for granted.  Because some of us only have a picture.
Appreciate, honor, and love that father you have. He’s the only one you get. Keep it smooth people!

 

A Moment for Mom

We at Smooth Vintage want to wish all the mothers, step-mothers, grandmothers, great-grandmothers, godmothers, foster mothers, legal guardian mothers, army mothers, baby mamas, the not with us physically but here spiritually mothers, mothering types, faith mothers and any other mother out there a very happy Mother’s Day.

Thank you for being the rock that holds the family down and thank you for all the little moments you share with us that last a lifetime. Your love, direction and influence helped to shape us into the smooth guys (and gals) of today and we will do everything to always be there just like you were for us.

Treat your mom right, she’s the only one you get.

Keep it smooth.

A Helping Hand

Last week  after dropping off my children at school, I started to drive out of the school parking lot and I noticed two kids, sent to throw out the classroom recycling, at the dumpster. The two were clearly struggling to open the dumpster, keep it open and toss the recycled materials in.

At first glance, I was going to just leave them to their business and continue to drive on off to work but some part of me decided to put my car and reverse and ask if they needed any help.  “You guys need any help with that dumpster?” I called out.

The smaller of the two went ahead and replied back, “No, that’s okay we got this.” I nodded in agreement, put my car back into gear and started to drive off.  Then a few seconds later I heard, “Actually, could you help us out? The dumpster lid is a bit too high for us.” I smiled, turned off my car engine and said, “No problem.”

Just a minute out of my day to lend a hand, I received a thank you for the kids and that was it.  All that mattered was someone needed help and it was given.  To all my smooth people out there, take the time out to lend a hand to help someone even if it seems like an inconvenience or insignificant.

People remember the little things you do and it really goes a long way.

 

Handling Business

This morning, the 15th of January, I observed something incredible as my wife and I dropped our children off for school. I saw dads walking their kid(s) to school, talking with them, telling them to have a good day, watching them play for a few minutes before they left on their daily duties, giving hugs, being involved.

It was humbling and a comfort to see other dads out there performing their dad role. And  I’m not talking about just seeing a couple of dads on the fringes of the playground. I’m talking about a decent number here, maybe 10 or 12, for school drop off. These guys are here doing what any parent should and not asking for any recognition. Just making sure their kids get to school safe and on time.

Respect to all the good dads out there handling business early on.

Stay smooth.